Thursday, October 23, 2014

5 Black Child Entrepreneurs Your Children Should Know

The black community must evolve to control our own community economics. We allow our $1.1 trillion dollar annual spending power to be squandered because we don’t have enough quality businesses to support in our community. Well instead of whining about it, let’s do something about it.

Let’s take the time to encourage and nurture our children to grow and become the entrepreneurs and business owners we need in the future. They are the next generation. They have the insight, courage, and ambition to do something big. We just have to be great parents and present them with these opportunities. One way to get their juices flowing is motivation.

Take a moment to discuss this article with your children. Make them aware of kids their age taking the entrepreneurial world by storm….and not waiting until they are adults to do it. This will allow your child to see kids their age doing great things. Who knows, they might be inspired in the process.

Business: Mo’s Bows

moziah-bridgesMoziah “Mo” Bridges, Age 11
Ever since he was four-years old and dressing himself, Moziah “Mo” Bridges, now 11, insisted on wearing a suit and tie whenever he could, even to the grocery store or while riding his bike. “I love dressing up,” says Bridges who found early inspiration from his father and grandfather who typically wear three piece suits for no particular reason. “I look and feel so much better in nice clothes. It makes me feel like an important person. ”

At first his mother and grandmother helped create the merchandise which they sold to family and friends. As the business increased through Facebook, an Etsy store and word of mouth, so did the production team. Now his other granny, aunts, cousins, and friends help him make bow ties as they sit around Bridge’s and his mom’s dining room table. Sometimes he’ll walk around the table and say, “how are my workers doing?” (He is the CEO of Mo’s Bows after all.)


Business: The Honeybunch Kids

Chental-Song BembryChental-Song Bembry, Age 14

Mission: To provide quality literature that entertains and educates children between the ages of 7 and 12. To launch a literacy campaign that will one day change the way children think about reading. To inspire children to set goals for themselves.

When you think of an author, the term entrepreneur doesn’t necessarily come to mind; but more book writers are beginning to realize that being an author takes a certain entrepreneurial spirit if you really want to move volumes. Just ask 14-year-old Chental-Song Bembry, who sold more than 500 books last year and is aiming to double that with the release of her second book this fall.


Business: Leanna’s Hair Inc.

leanna_archerLeanna Archer, Started at 8

Leanna founded her company Hair Inc . When she was 8 years old, and was named Magazine’sYoungest 30 Entrepreneurs under 30 . Using a family made ​​for hair repair, she Began her career by selling her product to fellow students. The buzz spread and soon orders Quickly Were coming from stores across the U.S. and online. Meanwhile, Leanna still have time to Develop new products, make the honor roll in middle school and have even Been Offered a scholarship from Harvard. She delivers motivational speeches Also in communication skills for parents and teens to live dreams Their Their Own and start business.


Business: Yumazu Anime Shop

Umar Brimah

At the age of 12, Umar Brimah runs his very own anime store called Yumazu (his name in Japanese). I opened the new shop in Cape Girardeau, Missouri. Turning his hobby into business, his mother put up $ 10,000 as an investment opening. Considering the Internet is one the only places you can find anime, some products can end up costing twice the price, plus shipping charges.

Yumazu offers collectors a place where anime They Will Have to pay additional money to get what They Want. Umar one day hopes to expand his business to a chain of stores.


Business: Kool Kidz Sno Konez

Jaden Wheeler and Amaya Selmon, Age 12 & 11

Jaden Wheeler and Amaya Selmon are the youngest owners of a food truck in Memphis, and by a few critical years. Neither is yet a teenager.

The brother and sister team — he’s 12, she’s 11 — own and operate Kool Kidz Sno Konez, a little enterprise that started in their front yard two years ago.

“We were always asking my mom for stuff, because we wanted her to buy us toys and things, and she said ‘Why don’t y’all make your own money?’” Amaya said.

“So I said to do a lemonade stand, but Jaden said we wouldn’t make any money, and he wanted to do a yard service. But Mama said no, because he could get hurt.”

They loved Jerry’s Sno Cones, a good drive from their southeast Memphis home, and that spurred the idea.


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