Saturday, January 7, 2017

Hidden Figures


Hidden Figures is the incredible untold story of Katherine G. Johnson (Taraji P. Henson), Dorothy Vaughan (Octavia Spencer) and Mary Jackson (Janelle MonĂ¡e)—brilliant African-American women working at NASA, who served as the brains behind one of the greatest operations in history: the launch of astronaut John Glenn into orbit, a stunning achievement that restored the nation’s confidence, turned around the Space Race, and galvanized the world. The visionary trio crossed all gender and race lines to inspire generations to dream big.

Monday, January 2, 2017

Did You Know She Is the Inventor of Lasik Eye Surgery? Meet This Extraordinary Woman!


If you are considering Lasik Eye Surgery, you can thank this woman who invented the procedure in 2000. She holds four of the patents on the procedure so you will be assisting her in her philanthropic work and helping her Alma Mata, Howard University through her endowment if you do get the procedure.

Dr. Patricia Era Bath (born November 4, 1942, Harlem, New York) is an2 American ophthalmologist, inventor and academic. She has broken ground for women and African Americans in a number of areas. Prior to Bath, no woman had served on the staff of the Jules Stein Eye Institute, headed a post-graduate training program in ophthalmology or been elected to the honorary staff of the UCLA Medical Center (an honor bestowed on her after her retirement).

Patricicia BathBefore Bath, no black person had served as a resident in ophthalmology at New York University and no black woman had ever served on staff as a surgeon at the UCLA Medical Center. Bath is the first African American woman doctor to receive a patent for a medical purpose.1 Her Laserphaco Probe is used to treat cataracts. The holder of four patents, she is also the founder of the American Institute for the Prevention of Blindness in Washington D.C. Born in Harlem on November 4, 1942, Bath was the daughter of Rupert and Gladys Bath. Her father, an immigrant from Trinidad, was a newspaper columnist, a merchant seaman and the first black man to work for the New York City Subway as a motorman.

Raised in Harlem, Bath was encouraged academically by her parents.Inspired by Albert Schweizer or his work in medicine, Bath applied for and won a National Science Foundation Scholarship while attending Charles Evans Hughes High School; this led her to a research project at Yeshiva University and Harlem Hospital Center on cancer that piqued her interest in medicine.

In 1960, still a teenager, Bath won the “Merit Award” of Mademoiselle Magazine for her contribution to the project.]After graduating high school early, Bath received her Bachelor of Arts in chemistry from New York’s Hunter College in 1964. She relocated to Washington, D.C. to attend Howard University College of Medicine, from which she received her doctoral degree in 1968. During her time at Howard, she was president of the Student National Medical Association and received fellowships from the National Institutes of Health and the National Institute of Mental Health. Bath interned at Harlem Hospital Center, subsequently serving as a fellow at Columbia University.[4]

During this period, from 1968 to 1970, Bath became aware that the practice of eye care was uneven among racial minorities and poor populations, with much higher incidence of blindness amongst her black and poor patients. She determined that, as a physician, she would help address this issue. She persuaded her professors from Columbia to operate on blind patients at Harlem Hospital Center, which had not previously offered eye surgery, at no cost.[8] Bath pioneered the worldwide discipline of “community ophthalmology”, a volunteer-based outreach to bring necessary eye care to underserved populations. She served her residency in ophthalmology at New York University from 1970 to 1973, the first African American to do so in her field.

After completing her education, Bath served briefly as an assistant professor at Jules Stein Eye Institute at UCLA and Charles R. Drew University of Medicine and Science before becoming the first woman on faculty at the Eye Institute founded the American Institute for the Prevention of Blindness, for which she served as president. In 1983, she became the head of a residency in her field at Charles R. Drew, the first woman ever to head such a department.

Patricia BathIn 1993, she retired from UCLA, which subsequently elected her the first woman on its honorary staff. She served as a professor of Ophthalmology at Howard University’s School of Medicine and as a professor of Telemedicine and Ophthalmology at St. Georges University.1 She was among the co-founders of the King-Drew Medical Center ophthalmology training program.
Bath has lectured internationally and authored over 100 papers.

Bath holds four patents in the United States. In 1981, she conceived of the Laserphaco Probe, a medical device that improves on the use of lasers to remove cataracts, and “for ablating and removing cataract lenses”. The device was completed in 1986 after Bath conducted research on lasers in Berlin and patented in 1988 making her the first African American female doctor to receive a patent for a medical purpose.

The device — which quickly and nearly painlessly dissolves the cataract with a laser, irrigates and cleans the eye and permits the easy insertion of a new lens — is used internationally to treat the disease. Bath has continued to improve the device and has successfully restored vision to people who have been unable to see for decades.

Three of Bath’s four patents relate to the Laserphaco Probe.In 2000, she was granted a patent for a method she devised for using ultrasound technology to treat cataracts.

Bath has been honored by two of her universities. Hunter College placed her in its “hall of fame” in 1988 and Howard University declared her a “Howard University Pioneer in Academic Medicine” in 1993.]

Source: http://urbanintellectuals.com/2016/03/31/know-inventor-laser-eye-surgery-meet-extraordinary-woman/

Wednesday, December 21, 2016

Fear of Becoming a Man


The tale of a young Black male and his struggles with understanding what becoming a man should be. He's also faced with the realization that no one had ever explained to him the difficulties of being a Black male. With no true positive role models to help combat the negative impact of society's degenerate depiction of Black men, he faces this arduous journey all while being raised amidst the urban decay of Philadelphia. He's desperately trying to figure it all out, while being counted out due to his educational challenges and his own personal insecurities. Not only is the fear relevant, the fear is real...The fear of becoming a Man !

Monday, December 12, 2016

Diamond Cut The Pain How To Shine Like A Diamond


Unique, edgy, authentic and relatable, Diamond Cut The Pain How To Shine Like A Diamond is an interactive eye opening self-help guide that will not only give you a lift where you are on the road of life, but send you on an emotional tour and have you laughing at the bumps and curves all the way to your destination!

Filled with helpful tips, real-life quotes, hands-on-exercises, stories and poems that are sure to make you say "I've been there," or "I hope that NEVER happens to me!" Diamond Cut The Pain How To Shine Like A Diamond is a down-to-earth fun way to inspire you to change the way you view life and yourself.

Fasten your seat belts, and get ready for the ride of a lifetime, highlighted by events from some of Miss Tiff's life...and yours!

Source: http://www.tiffanildance.com

Wednesday, December 7, 2016

ASPW: THE MARCUS THIGPEN STORY



Average Skill Phenomenal Will: The Marcus Thigpen Story
Success isn't given. It's earned.
Sometimes the trauma of rejection makes success seem impossible; especially in the face of unyielding obstacles. How many times do you have to fall before throwing in the towel makes sense? How many doors have to close before you consider other options? 
NFL star, Marcus Thigpen, takes us through his journey of failures turned success in a riveting tale of how perseverance and iron will can change even the most average of circumstances. 
This is a must read for students and adults of all ages! 


*PRE-ORDER ITEM* Shipments containing this item will Start shipping out  the week of {JAN. 7, 2016}. Other items ordered along with it will ship on the same date.

http://shop.etinspires.com/products/aspw-thigpen

Thursday, December 1, 2016

THE LITTLE BOY/GIRL WHO COULD (COLORING BOOKS)


Bring home both The Little Boy and Little Girl Who Could Special Edition Coloring Books!

**Coloring Books are only available as a set**

The Little Boy Who Could & The Little Girl Who Could series was created by Authors Nehemiah Davis & S.Deen, to inspire & motivate our children readers to be the best that they can be in all areas of life. These books discuss the importance of school as well as the importance of having & following your dreams. We understand that leaders are readers so we created not only fun stories, but stories with messages to encourage our youth to go from good to great. These Inspiring stories will keep our readers engaged from start to finish & they will encourage our youth to read more. These books are also read in MP3 audio format by international Speaker Naeem Hudson & International Entrepreneur Taylor Moxey.

Author: http://nehemiahdavis.com/


Saturday, November 5, 2016

NFL star Martellus Bennett on his new children’s book and app, Hey A.J.



It’s not everyday that a 6 ft. 7 in. NFL star says he is going to spend his offseason designing and launching a new interactive children’s app.

So to learn more, we sat down with Martellus Bennett, tight end for the New England Patriots and founder of The Imagination Agency, a multimedia production company designed to bring Martellus’ ideas to life.

The first product out of the studio is Hey A.J., a children’s book with an accompanying interactive mobile app. The app lets you read along with different narrators and play a game where you help A.J. make breakfast.

It’s certainly unusual for an NFL star to be creating children’s characters and stories in his spare time. But as Martellus explained, it’s something he’s done his whole life. But now, using proceeds from his football career, Martellus is shifting his focus from creating characters to actually putting them to work inside content like books, apps and animated film.

While Hey A.J. is the only project released so far, Martellus explained he has “hundreds of characters in his head” just waiting to be turned into a story. And it seems that he’ll get his wish, as his startup is planning to release two more apps and books over the next year, as well as upcoming animated TV and film projects showcasing Martellus’ creativity.

Watch the above video to learn more about Martellus’ vision for The Imagination Agency, how he thinks technology like virtual reality will change entertainment and what it’s been like trying to start a new company while playing in the NFL.

Hey A.J. is available online now, and the app is available in both the iOS App Store and Google Play Store.

Source: https://techcrunch.com/2016/06/30/nfl-star-martellus-bennett-talks-about-hey-a-j-his-new-childrens-book-and-app/